The Fall of the ANC at Open Book: More blood will flow

The intellectual boxing match between Prince Mashele and Charles Nqakula at the Open Book festival’s Fugard Theater main stage yesterday evening provided fascinating insight into the battered politician syndrome. Radio talk show host and author in her own right, Redi was the referee, although she was biased to Prince, her reason not having been bought

Open Book: Imagine a city

Ironically, post-apartheid government policy has reinforced the spatial inequalities in our cities that apartheid shed so much blood to create. This is despite the “massive redistributive investment” to alleviate poverty since 1994, says Prof Edgar Pieterse, who is the director for the African Centre for Cities, a UCT-based research and teaching programme which has an

Chasing Chairs: Skimming over the chasm

Marriage, or co-habitation, as we understand it in modern society, is the most demanding of all relationships. More so because it is entered into willingly for a greater cause, being love. Sharing our life and our space with one other person, including grumpy mornings, stressed evenings in which work deadlines loom, midnight insomnia, Sunday boredom,

NewFoundLand: A lucid vision

Occasionally, patients on the surgeon’s table experience an accidental awareness while under general anesthetic. They are able to feel the slicing of the scalpel, but, paralysed by muscle relaxant, are unable to move or cry out. Perhaps mercifully, the amnesiac effects of anesthesia wipes away this memory. It’s as if it never happened. The conscious

To the vibarians: Change or vokof

So a new Village Green will rise at Victoria Girls High next year. That’s 300 traders who will inhabit a redesigned space. Smaller tents, all niched, and school accommodation readily available right there. Not bad. And traffic congestion moves from Rhodes to VG where a genius is going to sort it all all out. It

Virtual Frontiers: They’re Real

Francois Knoetze’s Virtual Frontiers is pretty incredible. A visual arts exhibition without art on the walls. The art lies in your own perception of the VR (virtual reality) you are experiencing. Six machines, six different videos, 13 minutes long, made from digitally edited 360-degree camera footage – of people and places all around Grahamstown and with

Kubili (2): gripping and fresh

I was gripped for the first hour, and then they ran overtime which is a festival no-no. Kubili (2) is double billed, but is more of a one-quarter and three-quarter bill. Women got the one quarter, men the other three. Notable, given that the theme is female identity and abuse of women. Durban choreographer Musa