Moonless: A trick of the light

It’s strange to call a play involving the death of a child, suicide, and self-imposed isolation sweet. But that’s the most apt description of Moonless, and it’s an ambiguous one. ‘Sweet’ is generally not a theatrical aspiration. Perhaps, given the subject matter in Moonless, this is quite an achievement, particularly as it is rather well-made.

Black Light: The underground is happening

The room is pumping. Strobes, smoke, the tang of spray painters, chest-bursting 80s electro-pop synth and base, and there above the DJ table are two artists posturing in glitter in a celebration of representational erotica which is so exaggerated it is hilarious and tremendous fun. Hipsters and bohemians in flowy, grungy jackets and tight jeans

Wanderer: all that glitters is not gold

Yowzerz. It’s easy to figure out how Wanderer was selected for the main. Energy! Pizazz! All the lights! Smoke! Live electric guitar! Pow! Dance technique to kill for! Phwoah! Six athletes power through a gruelling performance alternating between action packed unison and duet battles and mechanical gestural work and stiflingly still moments. Their movement quality

Zombie Attack: The fear!

Gaëtan Schmid greets us as we come into the venue (the intimate Masonic Back) with his wide, boyish smile and welcomes us into the show with an equally generous introduction. The set consists of a speaker, a beautifully crafted wooden little school desk and chair and a wall filled with post-it notes on which are

I am Somebody: The techno Olympics of happiness

By Sheena Stannard: This techno, clowning music show launches us into an immediate state of childlike glee. Swedish Sirqus Alfon is on a mission to spread enjoyment, love and self-belief. Using incredible digital tricks and visual illusions with technical high jinks, the three clown musos intoxicate the 400 of us in the Guy Butler Theatre